Crossing the Sierras

Spitting and Sputtering Our Way Across the Dusty Sierra Madre Carl Lumholtz’s description of crossing the Sierra Madre Occidental in 1890 leaves one quaking with fear of the unknown. Not much has changed in 120 years, but the opportunity to try to retrace his route left us shaking with anticipation. Near the beginning of his journey in Sonora, he describes leaving Granados for Bacadehuachi, and Nacori Chico. This extant route is for four-legged foot traffic and vaqueros only. We checked […]

Read more »

Slog in the Sonoran Sierras – A Feast of Thorns

As part of our long term goal of retracing the steps of the early known explorers of the Sierra Madre Occidental, we set off from a ranch near the confluence of the Yaqui and Sahuaripa rivers on an exploratory hike. We hope to hike from Sonora to Chihuahua this year, but we’re still trying to find the trailhead! Sonoran Sierra Map To scout the route, we hiked uphill from the ranch house to a panoramic vista that offered a tantalizingly […]

Read more »

Trans-Americas Journey Sets the Record Straight

Jeff alerted me to this excellent post: Top 10 Reasons to Go to Mexico (a retrospective), which was originally posted at Trans-Americas Journey. We can’t help but like a blog that makes the following point: “For the record: after 18 months of independent overland travel driving nearly 25,000 miles through 29 of the country’s 31 states we can report, first hand, that we have never seen or sensed any threat or danger of any kind at any point anywhere in […]

Read more »

Blog: East by West: Keeping Tabs on PG Family

Some of you may know Ian Davie, son of my dad’s pal the infamous Morgan Davie. Or some of you may just enjoy reading interesting travel blogs. In either case, I recommend Ian and his girlfriend Amy’s travel blog East by West. Right now they are in Croatia blogging about cats, but  someday I hope to lure them back  to Mexico.

Read more »

Destination: Querétaro

I’m not one to knock the pleasure of sipping a margarita while staring at the azure sea, but I do wish that more travelers would stray away from the coasts to see Mexico’s amazing highlands. Although I love the casual coastal scene, the inland has so much to offer in terms of history, architecture, cuisine, and the finer aspects of Mexico’s culture. SF Gate recently listed the state of Querétaro as one of the five safest states in Mexico. Not only […]

Read more »

Tenacatita Bay Bugle Report

For those of you who would like to refresh your memory on the Tenacatita case, check out the Tenacatita Bay Bugle. The author, Michael J. Fitzgerald, has offered tireless coverage of the story since day one. He also reports on other interesting developments in the area, including a March 13 report that equipment is in place to turn Highway 200 into a four lane road. That sounds like a remarkable engineering project. If any of you have  any updates on […]

Read more »

Bienvenidos!

In addition to slaving away on the upcoming 14th (!) edition of The People’s Guide to Mexico, we have finally made the leap to the 21st century (or thereabouts) with a new website. As you can see, we are now live at thepeoplesguidetomexico.com; our archives can still be plumbed at our old site, peoplesguide.com. Lorena has been burning the proverbial midnight oil and endlessly harassing our tireless and talented Web guru Kelly, who, in addition to giving us a new […]

Read more »

Ebyline Wants to Create an iTunes for Journalism – NYTimes.com

the relationship between freelance journalists and the newspapers, magazines and websites they write for is archaic and inefficient (as someone who recently worked for a major newspaper, I can vouch for this). Freelancers have to cold-call publishers and then negotiate their own rates, then they have to invoice and manage their own billing and payment. Ebyline automates that process, handling all the billing and payment between the writer and the publisher. Freelancers can also “self-syndicate” by putting their content up […]

Read more »