Stone Soup? Sarah Borealis on Oaxacan Cuisine

Oaxacan stone soup

Visual historian Sarah Borealis talks about culinary tradition, eating in Oaxacan markets, and her new documentary “The Path of Stone Soup,” which explores the culinary heritage of Oaxaca’s Chinantla region. As Borealis explains,Chinantla’s specialty is a freshwater seafood soup “cooked to perfection using red hot stones.” I was interested to learn that the dish is traditionally prepared by men. The 24-minute documentary is the work of an international team that includes Borealis, director Arturo Juarez Aguilar, and César Gachupin de […]

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Food Tourism in Mexico?

A bin of Mole Negro mix in a Oaxaca market

I recently received the following note from a reader who is planning a week-long trip to Mexico for his dad’s 70th birthday. Daniel writes: My brothers and I want to take our Dad to Mexico this December or January–Oaxaca and Mexico City maybe. My Dad is a chef and so we were thinking there might be a guide that could show us the best food experiences with the most appropriate accommodations etc. My Dad has been cooking Mexican for years […]

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Road to Bahia Tortugas, Baja?

Flag of baja california sur

  A reader writes: Need to meet a boat In Turtle Bay in June – – – wondering what the road condition will from the main highway to Turtle? Codo answers: When you are in the town of Vizcanio, fill up your tank at the Pemex gasolinera on your right before the intersection to Tortugas. There is a gasolinera in Bahia Tortugas but it’s an awful long way in case it’s out of gas. In Vizcaino, there will be a […]

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Little Italy in Mexico?

Grilled chicken and fresh cheese from the state of Puebla.

“I smell fresh tortillas,” I said, with the feverish conviction of a bloodhound. Rich, Gina, and I were straggling down the edge of the highway, cooking in the sun and looking for a lunch spot to kill some time while the guy at the nearby taller changed Miss Lousiane’s oil. We approached a roadside restaurant, which was painted bright green and attended by a smiling proprietor of a very old-school breed: long braids, a crisp checked apron over her flowered […]

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Road Notes: Puerto Angel to Melaque

An '87 Dodge Van in Mexico with palm trees.

If you happen to stop in at Playa Banco de Oro, stop in at Restaurante Hermanos Galinda. The proprieter, Carmen, is super nice and makes a mean fried huachinango. Plus you can camp at her restaurant. Miss Lousiane hangs out at Restaurante Hermanos Galinda Fish for breakfast!                                                     photo by Gina Dilello Restaurante Hermanos Galinda                                               photo by Gina Dilello A massive renovation of Highway 200 seems to be underway. Entire sections are being created, and some are already drivable. We were […]

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Road Food Round-Up: Barbacoa and the Search for Taco Greatness

A man cuts meat at a Mexico City taqueria.

                                                  “Barbacoa Don Cuco” The white rabbit blinks pink eyes and settles deeper into its nest of foil-wrapped lollipops. No, this isn’t a department store Easter display–it’s just another day at a roadside barbacoa restaurant on the highway between San Miguel de Allende and Queretero. Barbacoa Don Cuco is an airy room furnished with Mexico’s ubiquitous white plastic chairs and tables, a large horno, a sturdy wooden slab where a teenage boy dices meat with a cleaver and an old […]

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Road Food: Torta Round-Up

A good torta is a thing of beauty. And in Mexico, a good torta is not hard to find. Any self-respecting Mexican city boasts hundreds of torta shops: from the steaming fondas of the mercado to the tiny tiled diner tucked between the behemoths of the business district. Each of these establishments has its own tricks, but seldom do you see drastic variations. You have your torta de pierna, your torta de milanesa, your torta de jamon, your torta cubana, […]

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Zacatecas! (Shhh!)

zacatecas

Sometimes I like to pretend that I am a 17th Century Marquise. Unlike my disreputable house in the Oregon Coast Range, Zacatecas is a good place to practice this delusion. More specifically, the Hotel Casa Santa Lucia really fosters delusions of grandeur. After two nights in cheap-ass accommodations (180 pesos and 60 pesos respectively) we decided we could afford to splurge on a little colonial luxury. Miss Louisiane lurking disreputably in front of fancy hotel. Located in downtown Zacatecas, The […]

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Road Food: Burrito Round-Up

Desert ridge in Chihuahua Desert.

As I’ve mentioned, burritos are not exactly synonymous with Mexican food in my world. That said, Chihuahua is burrito country and I’ve resolved to eat as many as possible as we cross the state’s vast and thorny expanse. Burrito #1-“RR” Restaurant and Hotel, Jamas, Chihuahua The classic Chihauhau burrito is long, narrow, loosely rolled, open at both ends, and served without a fork. This fifteen peso ($1.20) chicken burrito filled the bill and was especially satisfying because we were cold […]

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Road Food: The Railroad Station Bar and Grill

A hamburger with pile of fries.

“Yes! Parking right in front!” Churpa exclaimed as I pulled Chuey alongside the curb in front of The Bluebird Cafe in Ukiah, California.  At this point, we were already at risk of one or both of us descending into a hypoglycemic fit, but being extremely picky (and also creatures of habit), we held out for a place we knew served good food and beer on tap. To our dismay, The Bluebird was closed.  We sat in the van for a […]

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