Excerpts from Steve's Travel Journal: 1995

editor’s note: When I was in high school, my mom got a job and an apartment so I could go to school in town. Those winters, my dad, Steve Rogers (co-author of People’s Guide to Mexico) went down south on his own for the first time since he and my mom got together. In 1995, my mom gave him a journal to record his travels for us.  I know other people out there miss Steve as much as I do, […]

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Flashback Mexico Travel Journals 1992-2013

Dec 31-Jan 10, 1992  Tenacatita, Jalisco (age 13) We traveled through the dessert (which was kind of boring) and then we crossed the border. We then drove down to visit our friends the Huichols. Guillermo had just left for the sierra! Too bad. We had an OK time with the Huichols and I once again tried tortilla making and failed. I can do it with a press, but patting it out by hand is beyond me. (Mine always are full […]

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Historical Photo of the Week: Palacio

A vintage postcard of the domed Palacio de Bellas Artes in Mexico City's Centro Historico.

                              I’m not sure exactly when this was shot, but a love the vintage postcard look of this photo of the Palacio de Bellas Artes, one of my favorite buildings in Mexico City.

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A Rhode Islander in Mexico

Erik Loomis, who usually writes at one of Rich’s favorite blogs, is currently in Mexico and blogging about his trip. His first post  begins with a charmingly reasonable statement: “Mexico is a pleasant and safe place to be if you are not part of the drug trade. There are regions that are more safe than others, but by and large, there are no real problems for visitors, and I don’t just mean in the areas that are basically the United […]

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Historical Photo of the Week: Jackie in Mexico City

Jackie Kennedy stands surrounded by dancers clad in white.

    Another photo from the Kennedy’s 1962 diplomatic visit to Mexico City. The president and first lady attended a performance at the ballet folklorico and joined Mexican president Lopez Mateos to greet the dancers after the performance. Interestingly, I’m finding a lot of photos (and one video) of this trip, but not much in the way of text. This photo credited to Cecil Stoughton, White House/John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum, Boston  

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Cerveza Rising: Mexico's Craft Beer Revolution

A picture of a bottle of Hidalgo beer, from Mexico.

  When I was in my twenties, I considered Mexico to be beer heaven. At the time I was an avowed drinker of cheap light beer and Mexican beer was basically a better, slightly cheaper version of the beer I was drinking at home (Olympia and Rainier). Then I turned 30 and something terrible happened: I developed a taste for  craft beer. This was bad news on a number of levels. For one thing, it fit into a distinct and […]

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Historical Image of the Week: The Occupation of Mexico City

A battle in the war between Mexico and the US.

First published in 1850, this lithograph depicts the US Army occupying the zocalo in Mexico City’s Centro Historico. The image was originally published in The Mexican War and its warriors : comprising a complete history of all the operations of the American armies in the Mexico . . . illustrated with numerous engravings. Image courtesy of NYPL digital collections.

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Cost of Living: Mexico City, SMA vs. New York

A San Miguel de Allende street scene.

At Moon.com, Julie Doherty Meade compares specific costs of living in New York, Mexico City, and San Miguel de Allende. Meade’s writing is engaging and this could be a useful resource if you are contemplating a move to Mexico. Meade rates Mexico City as slightly more expensive than SMA, which was surprising to me. I would have thought it would be the other way around, though I’ve never done a scientific comparison. I will say that her food estimates are […]

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Book Review: The Last Prince of the Mexican Empire

The story has plenty to lure the reader: banditry, kidnapping, hubris, madness; but it is a fine attention to detail, on both the factual and visceral levels, that distinguishes C.M. Mayo’s first novel, The Last Prince of the Mexican Empire. Drawing from original research and a nuanced understanding of Mexico, Mayo relates one of the country’s more fantastic historical episodes: Maximilian, an idealistic Austrian prince who, with French backing, is crowned emperor of Mexico in 1864. With his young wife, […]

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