Baja Reaches for the Stars–How to Hike Picacho del Diablo

Picacho del Diablo, Baja.

Text and blisters by Mike Huckaby Baja’s high point is a fun endeavor and an obvious destination for Sea of Cortez kayakers, mountaineers of all stripes, and beach goers frolicking in San Felipe. Four-wheelers love to spin sand on the road to the trail head, and naturalists love the inviting freshwater pools near the trail head. What’s not to love? Stately cardon and the umbrella canopy of ocotillo dot the beautiful Baja desert. Robin’s egg blue skies meet the immense […]

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Dancing with the Devil: Climbing Baja’s High Point

Picacho del Diablo

The attempt of Picacho Del Diablo is not a summit to be undertaken lightly. The map shows a 13 km trail, so you practically have to figure thirteen hours of route finding. But first, after just thirty minutes or so of hiking from the east side trailhead, you come to the most ingenious cow-excluding device known to geologic engineering. There is a little two foot waterfall into a turquoise blue pool about three feet deep. Yes, it’s only five feet, […]

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Twelve Days from the Tutuaca

I met some crazy people the other day. They looked normal, but when they said let’s go to Mexico and run practically unknown rivers, I knew  they weren’t that in touch with the real world. Sure enough. They live in a world of their own. I’m glad they shared a bit of their “separate reality” with me. The thrust of the undertaking was to start on the Rio Tutuaca near the Dolores mine, and by raft and inflatable kayak navigate […]

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Letter from a Reader: Easy Walks in Oaxaca's Sierra Norte?

Couple stands in front of agave on hike in Oaxaca mountains.

A reader writes: I hope this is not too detailed a question, but I have not found information elsewhere so I thought I would give you a try. My husband and I are visiting Oaxaca  and had looked forward to visiting the villages and enjoying the natural beauty of the Sierra Norte for a few days. Unfortunately, my husband is recovering from a pulled muscle. He is fine to walk around, explore villages, (sit on a bench and enjoy a […]

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Birding Hikes in the Copper Canyon?

Michael Huckaby hikes the Copper Canyon.

Erin writes: I’m a gal traveling solo (with dog) and plan on spending 1.5 weeks in the Barrancas del Cobre region and am looking for advice. I have a truck and a safe place to keep it in Baltopilas and Creel. I am an avid birder and naturalist and am looking for some birdy multiday and day hikes. Do you have any insight as to good spots for eared quetzal or military macaws? I just finished reading the PG and […]

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Ojo de La Barranca: Gateway to Adventure

Lonely Planet’s first reports from Copper Canyon centered around Creel, and despite decades of tourism most visitors still begin there journey there. Unfortunately, if they arrive in Creel from the coast by train, they’ve already passed the canyon! So instead of backtracking, they go to the bottom of the canyon by bus to Batopilas. Que barbaro! More information would allow visitors to get off the train in Bahuichivo, and get to Urique much quicker than the 2 day connection to […]

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The Call of the Canyons

Copper Canyon Steep Trails

editor’s note: PG correspondent Mike Huckaby is a seasoned hiking guide. If you are interested in sustainable tourism and really getting off the beaten path, we highly recommend Copper Canyon Trails. December 12: Dia de la Virgin de Guadalupe The week preceding la Dia de la Virgin brought four days of rain, and promised more. Celebrations in Creel sounded like the Blessing of the Fleet. Big trucks from lumber, mining, construction, tourism, and ranching converged in a cacaphony of horns, […]

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Exploring Oaxaca's Pueblos Mancomunados

Couple stands in front of agave on hike in Oaxaca mountains.

editor’s note: the following post is from Billy and Kaki Burruss, who have kindly capitulated to my request for chronicles of their Oaxaca adventures. If you are interested in arranging a trip in the Pueblos Mancomunados, Billy and Kaki recommend Expediciones Sierra Norte. Kaki writes: Pueblos Mancomunados are seven towns that have united to form an ecological preserve. They manage their forests for conservation and firewood, they bottle water, and provide cabins and guides for hikers. At nearly 10,000 feet, […]

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Mike Huckaby Answers Your Copper Canyon Questions

Michael Huckaby hikes the Copper Canyon.

Expert Copper Canyon guide Mike Huckaby (of coppercanyontrails.org) graciously offered to answer reader questions about the Copper Canyon. M writes: I live in Jalisco and will be driving most likely to El Fuerte and then taking the train thru Copper Canyon to Creel. Once we get our car back, we will head north to Mata Ortiz, visit friends and then back to Jalisco. How do people who do this get back to their car? Also, once we have the car […]

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Book Review: The Ultimate Hang

Hammocks were a big deal in my family. We had opinions about hammocks. I was raised with the gospel of hammocks, and I never deviated. The best hammocks in the world are woven in the Yucatan Peninsula. In a perfect world, one would always buy one’s hammock by the kilo at an ancestral cave-like Merida hammock shop. Cotton thread, not acrylic. Ropes should not be tied directly to the hammock ends. One should lie in the hammock at a slight […]

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